Scientific Research in Martial Arts

We conduct research in sports and exercise science specialising in martial arts. Some of our recent research projects are listed below.

The effects of traditional martial arts-based breath control training on muscle strength and heavy load carriage performance (The Amplification of Biomechanical Force (ABF) Project)

This project is currently being undertaken in conjunction with the University of Southern Queensland as a part of Sherrilyn's Doctorate.

Read More

Aims:

The overall aim of this projects is to investigate the effects of traditional martial arts-based breath control training on muscle strength and heavy load carriage performance. To achieve this the project will:

1. Report the results of interventions that have investigated techniques for improving the ability of individuals to undertake heavy load carriage using a systematic review and meta-analysis.

2. Investigate the effects of verbal instructions during acute (15 minutes) martial arts-based breath control training on neuromuscular activation and intra-abdominal pressures in young and healthy individuals using a randomised control trial. We aim to determine whether the instructions commonly used in martial arts training result in greater activation of key musculature and improved control of intra-abdominal pressure during breath control exercises in untrained individuals compared to placebo instructions.

3. Investigate the effects of chronic (12 weeks) martial arts-based breath control training in addition to resistance exercise training on limb muscle strength, endurance, and load carriage performance in young and healthy individuals using a randomised control trial.


Investigation into intra-abdominal pressure and neuromuscular activation to increase force production in traditional martial arts practitioners
Undertaken in 2019 - 2020

This project was conducted in conjunction with the University of Southern Queensland as a part of Sherrilyn's Master of Science (Research) degree.

Read More

Summary:

The extent to which martial arts practitioners utilise respiratory pressures and neuromuscular activation during force production is not well known. This study investigated whether Chinese wushu (kung fu) practitioners utilise a greater proportion of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and neuromuscular activation of the respiratory and pelvic floor muscles to increase their force production compared to healthy control participants.

Conclusions:

Trained wushu practitioners appear to utilise IAP to a greater extent than untrained controls with similar physical activity levels to produce higher levels of force. These findings may have implications in a wide range of sports and activities, as these methods may be adapted and taught to individuals to improve performance, prevent injury or aid in rehabilitation.


Mission
To make objective scientific key performance indicator testing services for martial arts and combat sports available to everyone. We offer a transparent, confidential, professional service that is affordable to the general public.
Who We Are
We are professional martial artists and self defence experts as well as accredited coaches, scientists and engineers dedicated to testing combat performance where the rubber hits the road. We are not exercise physiologists. If you want to know what your blood lactate level is, go to an exercise physiologist. If you want to know how effective you will be in a fight, come to us.
Technology
KPI measurement and tracking has long been known to improve physical performance. Up until recently, very little has been available in terms of KPI measurement specific to the fighting arts. Technological advances and our own innovative tests and equipment have changed all that.